for you, a thousand times over

for vagabonds who indulge in behaviors that cut ten years off their lifespans and add ten paragraphs to their life stories.

21 year old UC Berkeley computer science nerd.

I like: pop culture and social issues; technology and politics; electronic beats and sentimental lyrics; bonfires and coffee shops; Mean Girls and Harry Potter references; jutting hipbones and too-bright eyes; boys in leather jackets.
I like: things that are beautiful and broken; pretty words that don't make sense; feelings that can't be defined; songs that sound better in the dark; believing too much in the endless possibilities.

ask me anything

Tell me how all this, and love too, will ruin us.
These, our bodies, possessed by light.
Tell me we'll never get used to it.
Jul 17
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danielpardini:

.gif remix “edward hopper” painting

danielpardini:

.gif remix “edward hopper” painting

(via longlivethequeen)

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So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism.
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d3lt4:

Fibonacci Sequence (Circle) Print (60x80 cm)
Fibonacci, Italian mathematician of the 12th century.

d3lt4:

Fibonacci Sequence (Circle) Print (60x80 cm)

Fibonacci, Italian mathematician of the 12th century.

(Source: d3lt4, via longlivethequeen)

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2000-lightyearsfromhome:

hong kong 40 years ago.

2000-lightyearsfromhome:

hong kong 40 years ago.

(Source: aseasonoffolly, via longlivethequeen)

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Conan and Dave Franco Join Tinder

Dave Franco is so adorable.

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For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

(via longlivethequeen)

Jul 14
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No matter what they try, they won’t take away our will to fight

Jul 13
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fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.

(Source: baahts, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

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kateordie:

I can’t overstate the importance of this movie, and specifically this exchange.

(Source: thehurlscouts, via angibitao)